Another month’s worth of pictures from the road. For previous instalments, click here.

 


 

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In the small towns and villages of southern Peru, we’ve regularly encountered eye-catching posters promoting shows by regional bands. These publicity stills generally show an unnecessarily large cluster of men wearing matching outfits and making, with a degree of uniformity, a profoundly meaningless gesture. The image above is pretty much textbook.
Yanque, 04, Peru
1 March 2014

 


 

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… But this one, which appears to be the ‘before’ shot from when Manchester City signed up to Weight Watchers, may be even better.
Yanque, 04, Peru
1 March 2014

 


 

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Before Ruth’s little run-in with one of Peru’s finest sent us scurrying back to Arequipa in search of medical assistance, we’d been greatly enjoying our time hiking in Colca Canyon, one of the world’s deepest.
Colca Canyon, 04, Peru
2 March 2014

 


 

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Emerging from an Arequipa restaurant after lunch, we walked right into a gleeful carnival procession snaking around the streets of Cayma and Yanahuara. We briefly hoped we’d escape unscathed, but a pair of gringos carrying a camera were always going to be an easy target.
Arequipa, 04, Peru
4 March 2014

 


 

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Privately owned and run since its founding in the 1920s, Lima’s Museo Larco is famous for its matchless array of Pre-Colombian art and artefacts, and quietly infamous for its vast collection – the world’s largest, apparently – of filthy ceramics. These are two of the milder examples.
Lima, Peru
9 March 2014

 


 

span1-1024We were extremely surprised to find a museum in Lima documenting the infamous attempt to defend and promote Catholic orthodoxy that was established by the leaders of Aragon and Castile in the 16th century. But that’s because – all together now – nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition.
Lima, Peru
10 March 2014

 


 

airport-1024It seems that Peruvians haven’t quite got the hang of hand luggage restrictions on aeroplanes. Along with the scissors, the Stanley knives and the bewildering quantity of spanners in this repository of confiscated items, which sat next to one of the X-ray machines at Jorge Chávez International Airport in Lima, you can, near the top, just about make out the handle of a handgun.
Lima, Peru
11 March 2014

 


 

englishpub-1024‘Good foods & drinks’.
Nuestra Señora de La Paz, L, Bolivia
14 March 2014

 


 

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Sunday morning in central La Paz often means a parade, and a parade in South America usually means raucous brass bands, formation dancing and tremendous costumes. The consumption of alcohol is usually limited to the spectators. But for whatever reason, pretty much every participant in this particular spectacle – we never did find out its significance – had a beer in hand. The dancing was, perhaps, a little more ragged than usual.
Nuestra Señora de La Paz, L, Bolivia
16 March 2014

 


 

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The charango is a traditional Bolivian instrument with 10 strings, not dissimilar to a mandolin. Apart from this perfectly ludicrous five-necked example, that is, which has 44 strings – imagine trying to tune the thing – and isn’t similar to anything we’ve ever seen or played. It was christened the charango estrellita (‘little star’) by Ernesto Cavour, its inventor and the founder of La Paz’s engaging Museum of Musical Instruments.
Nuestra Señora de La Paz, L, Bolivia
19 March 2014

 


 

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Looking back down the Inca trail that runs along the top of Isla del Sol, 4,040m above sea level and 200m above Lake Titicaca, which surrounds it.
Isla del Sol, L, Bolivia
24 March 2014

 


 

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Yes, them again.
Puno, 21, Peru
28 March 2014

 


 

junayaviri-1024Language barriers. On the right, Jun, a lovely Japanese cyclist we met in Puno (and about whom you can read more in our Encounters pages), who can speak a little English but virtually no Spanish. On the left, our host at our hostal in the bustling town of Ayaviri, who’s learning English at college but is still something of a beginner. With the aid of Spanish-English and Japanese-Spanish dictionaries, they just about managed to make themselves understood to each other. (We think.)
Ayaviri, 21, Peru
30 March 2014

 


 

from Cusco, 08, Peru